Film Review

Movie Review Children Of The Corn (2023)

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Movie Review Children Of The Corn (2023)

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Movie Review  Children Of The Corn (2023)
Movie Review  Children Of The Corn (2023)

Children of the Corn , 2023

Written and directed by Kurt Wimmer.
With Elena Kampuris, Kate Moyer, Callan Mulvey, Bruce Spence, Steven Hunter, Erika Heinatz, Ashley Jurgens, Cece Stringer, Orlando Schwertt, Anna Samson, Joe Klocheck, Andrew S. Gilbert, Brian Meagan, Mike Duncan, Alilah Brown and Jayden. McGinley had it.

Syntax

The film follows events in a small Nebraska town that lead to the deaths of the adults by their children after the adults' carelessness ruins the children's crops and future.

Before we get into this Children of the Corn review, let's get one thing straight: While the film had a short theatrical run before it premiered at Vince, it isn't technically released in 2023.

This reboot of the beloved Stephen King story (from writer-director Kurt Wimmer, who helmed the massive Christian Bale cult classic several years ago) was filmed during the 2020 global health crisis and later had a small premiere in Sarasota, Florida, USA. He had. that year. year, just in time for Halloween. This begs the question as to why the film took so long to be released worldwide. Simply put, and this is not an exaggeration, Children of the Corn is the scariest Stephen King adaptation of all time and the worst horror film ever.

Still sitting on a farm in Nebraska, a tragedy that kills many children quickly occurs (the story is a prelude to the original film). The film has a strong desire to create a social meaning, because adults can die completely, thereby affecting the lives of future generations, especially since they do not want to fight for it. Eden (Kate Moyer), a young woman who picks up something in a cornfield, gathers her friends and starts killing adults.

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Meanwhile, there is 17-year-old Boleyn (Elena Kampuris), who, like many true teenage activists of that era, wants to fight for justice in a balanced way and above all without killing adults. Before the kids know what they're doing, a reporter is assigned to observe and cover the production, but things don't go as planned. Bolin's brother is upset that she plans to go to college elsewhere, so he stands up for his children.

In fact, the production's attempt to show that apart from these bloodthirsty 12-year-olds, it is the younger generation that needs to step up and right the ship is interesting (the film is still set in the eighties, but the style is very clear as modern). The problem is that once the killing starts, it's so lame that the filmmakers try to cover it up with editing, but when you end up with a fundamentally poorly edited film, the footage becomes redundant and meaningless.

There is nothing worthwhile that Kurt Wimmer wouldn't have thought of. Children of the Corn trope will be boring to watch because the movie is so hilariously impossible to suspend disbelief that it's boring to watch and unmemorable in its violence and murder.

As Boleyn tried to survive the night, Wheaten's children fell and lost, and no one had prepared me for this. There's a CGI corn monster here that looks pretty scary visually, but it might be a really sad concept to use here to revive a franchise that wasn't particularly good and should have died.

Unfortunately, there is nothing dead in the corn, and the same goes for franchisees that need to be buried. However, Kurt Wimmer may have found a way to work around this fire. At least the kids seemed to be having fun…

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Flash Legends Rating – Movie: ★ / Movie: ★

Robert Coyder is a member of the Chicago Film Critics Association and the Critics Choice Association. He is also the review editor of The Flaying Legend. Stay tuned here for more feedback, follow me on Twitter or Letterboxd, or email me at [email protected].

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