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Vision Pro Gets Another Fully Immersive VR Game, With Cross-play to Other Headsets

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Vision Pro Gets Another Fully Immersive VR Game, With Cross-play to Other Headsets

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Tabletop action RPG Demeo (2021) is now available on Vision Pro, which prominently features a fully-immersive VR mode so you can crawl the game’s many dungeons alongside other virtual basement dwellers.

Resolution Games has finally released Demeo for Vision Pro, which includes cross-buy between all Apple devices, priced at $40. So while you’ll be able to buy it once and play it on your Mac, iPad or iPhone, you’ll also be able to play against anyone who owns the game across Steam, Quest and PSVR 2.

Check out the trailer below:

For now, the Vision Pro version of the game differs from its main analogue on Quest 3, as it doesn’t include an actual immersive passthrough mode, aka mixed reality.

Instead, it gives the user either a fully-immersive VR mode, or a ‘Windowed’ virtual screen in mixed reality, the latter of which looks a bit like playing the game on a floating iPad.

Here’s a look at some launch day gameplay, courtesy of tech analyst and YouTuber Brad ‘SadlyItsBradley’ Lynch:

While the studio hasn’t said as much, it’s thought that Resolution Games will eventually bring an update to allow for proper mixed reality gameplay, making it similar to their other Vision Pro app Game Room (2024). We’ve reached out to the studio and will update this piece when/if we receive a response.

Whatever the case, this makes Demeo one of the very few bona fide VR games on Vision Pro. While the platform boasts a number of mixed reality titles, including things like What the Golf? and Lego Builder’s Journey, its VR games are few and far between, with standouts including Synth Riders (also mixed reality), Proton Pulse, Just Hoops, and … not much else for now.

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This essentially comes down to Apple not prioritizing fully-immersive VR in favor of mixed reality. Substantively, Vision Pro doesn’t support any sort of motion controller, which means a majority of the best VR games in existence would need to be overhauled to entirely rely on hand-tracking, which filters out basically any game that requires quick and precise input to play. Even so, Vision Pro still costs $3,500, making it less broad of a platform to target when it comes to porting content directly from competing hardware, or creating stuff from the ground-up.





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